About Us

Executive Members

President – Ross Mackay – president@aeta.org.au

Editor – Diane Dunlop – editor@aeta.org.au

Secretary – Pauline Sheppard – secretary@aeta.org.au

Treasurer – treasurer@aeta.org.au

Executive committee members

  • Susan Bliss
  • Christine Cigana
  • Judy Pilch

If you would like to contact any of our executive, please email.


Mission Statement

The Asia Education Teachers’ Association (AETA), a voluntary non-profit organisation, dedicates itself to:

  • promote studies of Asia in Australian schools whether as a separate discipline, or as part of studies in other disciplines
  • publish materials dedicated to providing appropriate input about Asia to school teachers, as well as being a forum for the dissemination of ideas for improving studies of Asia in Australian schools
  • publish resources which can be helpful in teaching about Asia in Australian schools
  • promote and/or participate in conferences, seminars, or other discussions which are aimed at promoting studies of Asia
  • make representations to governmental or other bodies regarding studies of Asia courses in the school curricula
  • make representations to tertiary institutions regarding studies of Asia in tertiary courses, particularly for teacher education
  • disseminate news about this Association’s activities and its views about studies of Asia  through the media and through specialist newsletters and journals.

Constitution – Draft

 

A Brief History

The Asia Education Teachers’ Association (AETA), is a voluntary non-profit organisation, Valuing cultural diversity and promoting intercultural understanding in a networked world.
 
The Asia Education Teachers’ Association was started over four decades ago as the Asia Teachers’ Association by a small group of teachers responding to the introduction of a new course in NSW, Asian Social Studies.  This subject was taught in Years 7 to 10 and took an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Asia where respect and understanding of and for cultural diversity could develop in students, skills, which were essential for living and working in a networked, global environment.
 
Through interdisciplinary study, students would learn to INVESTIGATE, VALUE  and COMMUNICATE about the region on our door step. The study of History and Geography would be integrated with the study of culture, religion, anthropology, literature, language and the Visual and Performing Arts.
 
INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION is at the centre of what the Association produces for teachers to assist students to acquire a sense of relationship between the past, present and the future and to do it using a structure that enables them to deal with emerging issues relative to their society and to global civilisations.
 
The revolution in communications, necessitated a move to providing resources online to make them more accessible to teachers and provide savings in time, postage and costs to members. Relevant material from past Journals is gradually being added to the web site. We endeavour to:
  • promote Asian Studies in Australian schools whether as a separate discipline, or as part of studies in other disciplines;
  • publish materials dedicated to providing appropriate input about Asia to school teachers, as well as being a forum for the dissemination of ideas for improving Asian Studies in Australian schools;
  • publish resources which can be helpful in teaching about Asia in Australian schools;
  • promote and/or participate in conferences, seminars, or other discussions which are aimed at promoting Asian Studies or enhancing their quality;
  • make representations to governmental or other bodies regarding Asian Studies courses or their content in school curricula;
  • make representations to tertiary institutions regarding Asian Studies in tertiary courses, particularly for teacher education; and
  • disseminate news about this Association’s activities and its views about Asian Studies education through the media and through specialist newsletters and journals.

The badge of the Asia Teachers’ Association was designed by Mr Dhrubajyota Sen, and represents the main religious themes or traditions of Asia, and thus Asia itself. The circle or moo-design is typical of Japanese culture, but also signifies both the Buddhist wheel of life and the Brahmin impersonal soul of the universe. Within the harmony and simplicity of the circle are the yin and yang symbols, emblematic of both Taoism and of Confucianism. The crescent moon, while primarily a symbol of Islam, can also represent the Hindu God, Siva. The vajra or thunderbolt has connections with the Upanishads, but is also a symbol of Buddhism.

Copyright

© Asia Education Teachers Association 2022

 31/01/2022

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